EP Review: Walker McGuire’s Self-Titled EP

Fans of beloved duos like Big & Rich and LOCASH are bound to feel the same about Walker McGuire. The new country duo show off their smooth vocals and sharp songwriting abilities on their debut, self-titled EP that’s reminiscent of the harmonies of John Rich and Big Kenny, while taking a note out of the positivity book of Preston Brust and Chris Lucas, creating an impressive debut project.

Walker McGuire, consisting of Jordan Walker and Johnny McGuire, broke onto the country music scene in 2017 with their breakthrough Top 40 hit on country radio “Til Tomorrow,” with the EP building off of that success. The duo continue on the path modern country music has laid out, sticking to tried and true topics throughout the EP that makes for universal appeal. While incorporating the modern country sound into their music, they also add in a hint of traditionalism, leaning heavily on the country side of country-pop, which will not only entice traditionalists, but also invite fans of the modern sound. The collection of five songs gives listeners a strong taste of what to expect from the duo, who is sure only to grow on top of their burgeoning success.

Each song is a personable one, with the singers taking on topics that are sure to result in mass appeal from listeners. Themes of longing to stay forever young and feeling “Lost” without having the love of your life by your side are just two examples of how they keep things universal. “Mysteries of the World” shows off their clever songwriting skills, as the singers ponder life’s little quirks like “Why does beer have to taste so good, but too much makes you feel so bad” and asking the eternal question, where socks in the dryer go, and ultimately wondering how out of seven billion people on the planet, he was lucky enough to get the girl of his dreams.

“18 Forever” will have us all feeling like a teen again, celebrating the days of blissful ignorance and living like free spirits. “Back when young and dumb was beautiful, we knew that we knew it all no one could prove us wrong, those were the days,” the duo croon over their country twang. “Til Tomorrow” stands as the EP’s strongest track, showing off their steady voices, welcoming melody and lyrics that sing to the broken heart in all of us, while “Best Kinda Bad” is bound to make you think of that one person who you know is so wrong for you, but you just can’t seem it resist, with the guys thinking about the girl “that’s the wrong kind of right” but “the best night I ever had, she’s the best kind of bad.”

Walker McGuire seems to offer an authentic look at who this promising duo is meant to be, pulling together a body of songs that could easily be radio hits, and coupled with their defined voices and relatable lyrics, they’re bound for a career filled with many more.